Tag Archives: Coggins

A Week in the New Jersey Pine Barrens

It’s been 114 years this week (June 17−22, 1901) since Witmer Stone, his Academy of Natural Sciences colleague James Rehn, and fellow Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) member Herbert “Curly” Coggins took a six-day, 75-mile jaunt through the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Stone was in the early stages of his intensive botanical research in the Pine Barrens, having suddenly resolved, during a botanical outing there the year before, to write a flora of the region. Ten years later, he would publish his monumental The Plants of Southern New Jersey (PSNJ).

The men set out in a horse-drawn wagon laden with field supplies on June 17 from the newly-constructed “Catoxen” cabin near Medford (more on Catoxen in a later post). Here’s a photo of Catoxen c. early 1900s, with Stone on right with frying pan:

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They camped along the Batsto River their first night out, and had an unwanted adventure when their horse bolted and they had to chase it down in the dark. After those exertions, they fell asleep to the calls of Whip-poor-wills. The next day, they journeyed to the “town” of Speedwell (population 4), and used that as a home base for forays for the rest of the trip. (Speedwell is long gone; it wasn’t far from today’s Carranza Memorial.) In PSNJ, Stone wrote of the Pine Barrens, “Wagon roads lead across the white sand to the sea at frequent intervals,” and the roads and the scenery the party experienced were undoubtedly similar to this view along a two-track in the Barrens today:

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They explored a couple of different sections of “the Plains,” those parts of the Barrens where the vegetation only grows to a few feet. Coggins later wrote, “We wade into the scrub oaks scarcely able to believe that it is over the top of a dwarf forest that we are gazing for miles.” During the trip, they collected 400–500 sheets of plants, as well as insects, reptiles, mice, and other critters, for the Academy’s collections. They also found a new location for the rare Curly-grass Fern:

Photo 25 - Curly Grass Fern

Although they found little variety in the typically limited Pine Barrens avifauna, they did discover a House Wren nest in an old hat, and were amused by the name “Chimney Bats” used for Chimney Swifts by the locals around Speedwell.

Just when they thought they couldn’t suffer through any larger hordes of mosquitoes than they already had, they did: on the last night of their trip, they unwisely took accommodations in the hay barn of a Jones’ Mill farmer, which was infested with them. It was a long haul back to Medford the next day for the hot, tired, and thirsty travelers; according to Coggins, Ulysses couldn’t have been more relieved to return home to Ithaca after his odyssey than the three naturalists were to see Catoxen cabin come into view at the end of theirs.

Stone also recorded that “a number of photographs” were taken on the trip, and would be used in later Academy lectures. They would be fascinating to see; however, I don’t know the fate of the photographs, other than this one, which appeared in a later DVOC publication over the caption “Unwashed and Uncombed.” From left to right, Rehn, Stone, and Coggins (you can see why they called him “Curly”) look happy to be exploring the natural history riches of the still-amazing New Jersey Pine Barrens.

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Herbert and Leola Hall Coggins – Part 1

One of the more endearing characters in the Witmer Stone story has to be Herbert “Curly” Coggins, the affable DVOCer who moved to California in 1907 and never came back. His wonderfully whimsical way of describing “the baked potato incident” at Catoxen Cabin was one of the best little gems of letter writing that I came across during my research, and Stone’s characterization of him in the DVOC 20-Year Souvenir makes it obvious why he was such a DVOC favorite: Coggins “had the gift of looking at a thing from all sides and he generally took his final stand on the comical side and the worst of it was, things that others looked upon as serious looked comical to him and it was often hard to prove that he was wrong.” Coggins, 15 years younger than Stone, had gotten interested in birds after listening to Stone, on a visit to his alma mater, deliver a bird lecture to Coggins and the other students at Germantown Academy.

In The Fascination of Nature, citing a 1907 Cassinia article, I dutifully reported that Coggins moved to California in that year for health reasons. In a 1956 interview I found after publication, however, Coggins (who lived to be 93, dying in late 1974) threw a wrench into that minor storyline. His father and grandfather had both traipsed back and forth between California and Philadelphia at various times, as if they couldn’t decide which place they preferred to reside in, and Herbert said that in 1907 California beckoned: “I didn’t care much for Philadelphia as a city. I don’t like hot weather, and the cold weather is useless after you get too old to sled and skate…Perhaps I felt I belonged in California more than I did in Philadelphia…In one way, Philadelphia was drab. It was a business city, not particularly [culturally] colorful. Out in California there was more color.” One almost wonders if he didn’t cook up the health excuse as a way to avoid telling his DVOC and other Philadelphia friends that he just plain didn’t like the area and wanted to try the West Coast. Here’s a photo of Coggins from his California years (compare with the two Fascination photos of him):

Coggins

At any rate, in California he continued to work in the publishing industry, as he had in Philadelphia. Then he ran a cement business, and eventually an auto parts business. He turned to writing, publishing articles in The Atlantic Monthly and Collier’s Weekly; he even authored a children’s book. He became politically active in the Socialist Party, running unsuccessfully for various offices from 1918–1924, including the U.S. House of Representatives. He remained interested in birds, and for a time was president of the Cooper Ornithological Society. The best thing he did in California, however, was marry Leola Hall, a woman mentioned only in passing in The Fascination of Nature, but who is so interesting she deserves her own blog post. I’ll write about her in my next one.

Herbert and Leola Hall Coggins – Part 2

Herbert Coggins must have been a remarkable man, for he certainly married a remarkable woman who was way ahead of her time. Leola Hall was born in northern California, and studied painting as a young woman, including tutelages under some famous California artists. She worked in the office of her stepfather’s homebuilding business, and familiarized herself with the entire building process. Women architects and homebuilders were extremely rare at that time, but after people displaced by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake started settling in Berkeley, she began building homes there – designing the houses, sometimes supervising the construction, and decorating them. She built dozens of homes, some of which still stand.  One of the last ones she designed and built was the “Honeymoon Home” for her and her new husband, Herbert, in 1912, which is still extant. The couple never had any children.

After marriage, she turned more to politics (she was an active suffragist) and to painting portraits and landscapes. She was commissioned for portraits of Stanford president David Starr Jordan, poets Edwin Markham and Joaquin Miller, author George Wharton James, and artist William Keith (under whom she had studied), among others. Markham chose one of her portraits of him, which he deemed his favorite, to illustrate a book of his poems. This painting is said to be of hubbie Herbert, but it must have been shortly before she died; if it really is him, he’s decidedly not “curly” anymore, and looks like a tired old man, although he would not yet have been 50:

Coggins older by LHC

Leola was a successful landscape artist as well. Here is her painting of Flat Iron Peak in the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix, AZ:

LHC painting

A house in Monterey, CA:

LeolaHallCoggins adobe painting

Herbert described the modus operandi behind her success: “She was a house builder. She started as an art student and took up designing sofa cushions. They sold so well they had to be lithographed, and she rested from that business and built a house and sold it before it was finished. [She was once asked how she accomplished things, and answered,] ‘Well, I went to people who were successful and asked them. I found that instead of feeling competitive, people liked to tell you how they succeeded.’ She’d go right to another contractor or painter and ask him, and he’d be glad to tell her. They enjoyed being a part of her success…The psychology of a woman making a man think he’s smart. But I don’t think she thought it out that way.”

Here’s a photo of Leola, who was clearly a lovely and stylish lady:

LHC

Leola suffered from heart problems throughout her life, and they were the cause of her death shortly before her 50th birthday. She is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, CA. Some websites with information about this amazing woman: her gravesome portraits, and landscapes and other info here  and here.

Herbert “Curly” Coggins didn’t take the same path in life as his naturalist friends in the DVOC, and it appears that eventually he wasn’t even “curly” anymore. But he never lost his sunny disposition, and he lived a long, full, and fascinating life. For the Coggins quotes, and biographical details including some references to Stone, check out this interesting interview conducted in 1956 and archived at the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley – it’s an excellent source for details about Herbert Coggins’s life.